S|Y Offices

Type: Workspace
Program: Open and Private Offices
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Completed 2017
Brief: Rehabilitation of a 4000 SF office, including custom millwork

Unit 2808

Type: Residential-Interior
Program: High-Rise Condo Unit
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: Hi-Teq Construction
Status: In Construction
Brief: Renovation of a 750 SF space, including custom cabinetry and millwork

Visiting the Avenue

Type: Speculative
Program: 30" x 60” Double sided presentation board for "Between States" Exhibition
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Completed 2017
Brief: "Visiting the Avenue" is a speculative question, exploring what if the Avenue streetscape was transformed from a vehicular thoroughfare into a pedestrian-centric urban connection.

2016 West Rice

Type: Residential- New Construction
Program: Multi-Family
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Client: Ranquist & Spartan Development Groups
Construction: MC Construction Group
Status: In Construction
Brief: New 14,000 SF Eight-Unit Condominium Building

Michigan Loft

Type: Residential-Interior
Program: Loft Condo Unit
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: Artistic Construction
Status: In Construction
Brief: Renovation of a 2,250 SF space, including custom cabinetry and millwork

Newport Residence

Type: Residential-Gut Rehab
Program: Single-Family Home
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: DiCosola Group
Status: Completed 2016
Brief: Conversion of a two flat multi-family building into a single family residence with a third floor addition

Greenleaf Residence

Type: Adaptive Reuse
Program: Single-Family Residence
Location: Evanston, Illinois
Status: Unrealized, Design Completed 2016
Brief: Conversion of an existing commercial building into a single-family residence

Sawyer Residence

Type: Residential-Exterior Alteration
Program: Single-Family Home
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: Instyle Construction Inc.
Status: Completed 2017
Brief: Alteration of existing exterior space

Sawyer Residence

Type: Residential-Gut Rehab
Program: Single-Family Home
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: Instyle Construction Inc.
Status: Completed 2017
Brief: Conversion of a multi-family two flat building into a single family residence

Unit 9C

Type: Residential-Interior
Program: High-Rise Condo Unit
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: J5th Custom Renovations
Status: Completed 2016
Brief: Renovation of a 750 SF space, including custom cabinetry and millwork

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Type: Hospitality-Interior
Program: Fitness Room
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: Instyle Construction Inc.
Status: Completed 2015
Brief: Renovation of a 400 SF Fitness Room

Symbi

Use: Hanging and Organizing
Material: 7/8" Walnut and Maple Stock
Size: w 22"-12" d 12"-6" h 82"
Status: Available for Purchase

Unit 3E

Type: Residential-Interior
Program: High-Rise Condo Unit
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: Harder Brothers, Inc.
Status: Completed 2014
Brief: Renovation of a 750 SF space, including custom millwork

Artist Studio

Type: Workspace
Program: Workshop and Display Spaces
Location: Dorset, Vermont
Status: Unrealized, Concept Design Completed 2014
Brief: 1,000 SF Artist Studio

Wabansia Residence

Type: Residential-New Construction
Program: Single-Family Home
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: DB Homes
Status: Completed 2015
Brief: New 3,000 SF Single-Family Residence on a Chicago Squat Lot

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Type: Workspace
Program: Open and Private Offices
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Completed 2014
Brief: Rehabilitation and expansion of a 1000 SF office, including custom metal fabrication and millwork.

Chabad Center of Toledo

Type: Institutional-Religious
Program: Sanctuary / Classroooms / Offices / Kitchen / Bath House / Field House
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Status: Concept Design Completed 2013
Brief: New 14,000 SF Jewish Learning Center

Glenwood Exterior

Type: Residential-Exterior Alteration
Program: Single-Family Home
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: Harder Brothers, Inc.
Status: Completed 2013
Brief: Alteration of existing exterior space

Glenwood Interior

Type: Residential-Interior Remodel
Program: Single-Family Home
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Completed 2013
Brief: Renovation of two distinct areas of a single family residence

Saving Prentice

Type: Speculative
Program: Exhibition Board
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Completed 2012
Brief: To propose an image for the ‘Reconsidering an Icon’ Exhibition.

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Type: Institutional-Religious
Program: Sanctuary / Classrooom / Office / Kitchen / Bath House / Washrooms
Location: Suburban Chicago, Illinois
Construction: FB Construction, Inc.
Status: Completed 2012
Brief: Renovation and addition to an existing 1,700 SF synagogue.

Stand Alone

Type: Residential-Addition/Alteration
Program: Single-Family Home
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: Harder Brothers, Inc.
Status: Completed 2012
Brief: Addition of a new studio space and alteration to an existing pool room with new landscaping

Vegas Loft

Type: Residential-Interior
Program: High-Rise Condo Unit
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Status: Completed 2012
Brief: Renovation of a 1,500 SF loft space

Coupet Enclosure

Type: Residential-Interior
Program: Loft Condo Unit
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Construction: Harder Brothers, Inc.
Status: Completed 2011
Brief: Renovation and re-partitioning of a 300 SF bedroom

Big Sexy Table

Use: Dining Table
Material: Black Concrete Form Plywood
Size: w 32" l 144" h 29"
Status: Completed 2012

Locomobile Lofts

Type: Multi-Family Residential-Interior
Program: Lobby / Common Spaces
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Completed 2011
Brief: Renovation of a lobby and all common spaces for a 31-unit condo building

Planted Environment

Type: Residential-Interior
Program: Single-Family Home
Location: Geneva, Illinois
Construction: Harder Brothers, Inc.
Status: Completed 2010
Brief: Renovation of a 1,500 SF ground level space

RoundKeep Table

Use: Coffee Table
Material: Stainless Steel Base with Glass Top
Size: w 36" l 36" h 16"
Status: Completed 2011

Unit 4906

Type: Residential-Interior
Program: High-Rise Condo Unit
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Completed 2010
Brief: Renovation of a 550 SF space

Brise Soleil Canopy

Type: Residential-Addition
Program: Covered Exterior Shelter
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Completed 2009
Brief: A permanent sun-shading device integrated into an existing outdoor deck structure

[S]Table

Use: Multipurpose Table
Material: 1-1/2" x 1-1/2" White Oak Stock Glass Top Optional
Size: w 28" l 70" h 36"
Status: Completed 2010

R-3 House

Type: Residential-New Construction
Program: Single-Family Home
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Speculative
Brief: New 4,000 SF single-family home on a standard 1/4 acre Chicago lot

Link-In Table

Use: Multipurpose Table
Material: 3/4" Maple Board / 1/2" Glass Top
Size: w 30" l 100" h 29"
Status: Completed 2008

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

Type: Institutional-Religious
Program: Prayer Spaces / Library / Classrooms / Dining Area / Bath House
Location: Riverwoods, Illinois
Status: Concept Design Completed 2007
Brief: New 20,000 SF Jewish Learning Center

Unit 20G

Type: Residential-Interior
Program: High-Rise Condo Unit
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Status: Completed 2005
Brief: Renovation of a 800 SF space, including custom millwork

T.O.S.I.

Type: Speculative
Program: Unprogrammed
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Brief: An architectural thesis investigation dealing with curiosity and the understanding of architectural design development as a process of shared imagination

J-Box

Use: Jewelry Box
Material: 1/16" Walnut Veneer / Acrylic Spacers
Size: w 16" l 10" h 3"
Status: Completed 2007

R-Chair

Use: Rocking Chair
Material: CNC-Milled 1" Oak Veneer Plywood / Threaded Rod Connections
Size: w 30" d 28" h 37"
Status: Completed 2006

Wedding Bands

Use: Wedding Bands
Material: Gold Wire Strands
Status: Completed 2006

Sculpture Stand

Use: Sculpture Stand
Material: 2x4 Oak Base / 3/4"Oak Top / Threaded Rod Connections
Size: w 14" d 14" h 32"
Status: Completed 2005

Kesha Table

Use: Wall-Mounted Table
Material: 8ga Stainless Steel
Size: w 16" l 14" h 18"
Status: Concept Design Completed 2004

Tobik Table

Use: Coffee Table
Material: 8ga Stainless Steel Base / 3/4" Luize Blue Granite Top
Size: w 24" l 54" h 22"
Status: Concept Design Completed 2004

Line Necklace

Use: Necklace
Material: Silver / Amber
Status: Completed 2002

Watercolor Studies

Type: Conceptual Study
Program: N/A
Location: Europe

Parti Model

S|Y Offices

Intervention Diagram

S|Y Offices

Existing Plan

S|Y Offices

Proposed Plan

S|Y Offices

Enlarged Study Model

S|Y Offices

Existing Building

S|Y Offices

Existing Interior Conditions

S|Y Offices

Construction: Framing

S|Y Offices

Construction

S|Y Offices

Construction: Millwork Detail

S|Y Offices

Design Approach Study Models

Unit 2808

Existing Plan

Unit 2808

Proposed Plan

Unit 2808

Diagrams

Unit 2808

Interior Elevations

Unit 2808

Proposed Kitchen View

Unit 2808

Existing Conditions

Unit 2808

Palette Investigation

Unit 2808

Drywall

Unit 2808

Historical Reference: 1900' Chicago Surface Lines

Visiting the Avenue

2017 Ward 2 / Neighborhoods Outline

Visiting the Avenue

Streetscape Precedents

Visiting the Avenue

Sprouting Concept

Visiting the Avenue

Final Board Layout Diagram

Visiting the Avenue

Final Presentation Board

Visiting the Avenue

Site Location

2016 West Rice

Organization Model

2016 West Rice

Organization Diagram

2016 West Rice

Longitudinal Section

2016 West Rice

Cross Section

2016 West Rice

Material Research

2016 West Rice

Proposed Street View

2016 West Rice

Proposed Street View

2016 West Rice

Lower Units Floor Plan

2016 West Rice

Lower Units Interior View

2016 West Rice

Lower Units Interior View

2016 West Rice

Lower Units Floor Plan

2016 West Rice

Lower Units Interior View

2016 West Rice

Upper Units Floor Plan

2016 West Rice

Upper Units Interior View

2016 West Rice

Construction Drawing: Alley Elevation

2016 West Rice

Construction Start: Site Excavation

2016 West Rice

Construction: Foundation layout

2016 West Rice

Construction: Steel

2016 West Rice

Construction: Masonry ©Ranquist

2016 West Rice

Elevation Diagram

Michigan Loft

Section Diagram

Michigan Loft

Intervention Diagram

Michigan Loft

Main Level Floor Plan

Michigan Loft

Upper Levels Floor Plans

Michigan Loft

Existing Conditions

Michigan Loft

Demolition

Michigan Loft

Construction: Framing

Michigan Loft

Construction: Mezzanine Detail

Michigan Loft

Stair Detail

Michigan Loft

Concept Study Models

Newport Residence

Proposed Section

Newport Residence

Proposed Plans

Newport Residence

Existing Conditions: Exterior

Newport Residence

Existing Conditions: Interior

Newport Residence

Construction: Excavation and Underpinning

Newport Residence

Construction: New Aperture

Newport Residence

Construction: Framing

Newport Residence

Back Facade

Newport Residence

Canopy Detail

Newport Residence

Main Stair

Newport Residence

Main Stair

Newport Residence

Second Floor Gallery

Newport Residence

Kitchen

Newport Residence

View from Third Floor

Newport Residence

Existing Conditions: Exterior

Greenleaf Residence

Existing Conditions: Interior

Greenleaf Residence

Study Model: Parti

Greenleaf Residence

Proposed Site Plan

Greenleaf Residence

Organization Diagram

Greenleaf Residence

Proposed Floor Plan

Greenleaf Residence

Proposed Perspective

Greenleaf Residence

Wall Section Detail

Greenleaf Residence

Proposed Site Section

Greenleaf Residence

Proposed Exterior

Greenleaf Residence

Proposed Entry Sequence

Greenleaf Residence

Proposed Living and Dining

Greenleaf Residence

Proposed Kitchen

Greenleaf Residence

Proposed Master Bedroom

Greenleaf Residence

Existing Conditions

Sawyer Residence

Proposed Site Plan

Sawyer Residence

Study Model of Stair Assembly

Sawyer Residence

Final Model of Deck

Sawyer Residence

Deck Assembly Diagram and Material

Sawyer Residence

Deck and Screen Section

Sawyer Residence

Construction

Sawyer Residence

Detail View of Stair Assembly

Sawyer Residence

View of Deck

Sawyer Residence

View of Screen

Sawyer Residence

View of Deck

Sawyer Residence

Existing Conditions: Exterior

Sawyer Residence

Existing Conditions: Interior

Sawyer Residence

Proposed Plan: First Floor

Sawyer Residence

Proposed Plan: Second Floor

Sawyer Residence

Proposed Section

Sawyer Residence

Skylight Study Model

Sawyer Residence

Stair Assembly Diagram

Sawyer Residence

Stair Construction

Sawyer Residence

Main Stair © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Main Stair from Entry © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Kitchen View © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Kitchen Detail © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Upper Level Open Space © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Upper Level Open Space © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Upper Level Open Space © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Upper Level Open Space © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Master Bedroom Storage Closet © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Master Bedroom Entry Detail © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Master Bathroom © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Front Entry © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Front Elevation © Mike Schwartz

Sawyer Residence

Program Components

Unit 9C

Existing Plan

Unit 9C

Proposed Plan

Unit 9C

Diagrams

Unit 9C

Interior Elevations

Unit 9C

Pre-Existing Conditions

Unit 9C

Construction: Layers

Unit 9C

Construction: Bathroom

Unit 9C

Construction: Touch Ups

Unit 9C

Living Space © Bill Zbaren

Unit 9C

Towards Kitchen © Bill Zbaren

Unit 9C

Island Detail © Bill Zbaren

Unit 9C

From Entry © Bill Zbaren

Unit 9C

Island Corner Detail

Unit 9C

Towards Sleeping Area © Bill Zbaren

Unit 9C

Bathroom Wet Area © Bill Zbaren

Unit 9C

From Shower © Bill Zbaren

Unit 9C

Inside Sleeping Area © Bill Zbaren

Unit 9C

Concept Sketch

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Concept Model

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Existing/ Proposed Plans

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Intervention Diagram

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Study Model

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Intersection Study

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Inner Plywood Profiles

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Existing Conditions

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Construction Process

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

View from Corridor © Mike Schwartz

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Main Space © Mike Schwartz

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Detail View of Wall © Mike Schwartz

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Utility Core © Mike Schwartz

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Inside the Core © Mike Schwartz

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Main Space with Equipment © Mike Schwartz

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

Towards Entry © Mike Schwartz

2000 S. Michigan Fitness

An Idea

Symbi

Exploring Connections

Symbi

Exploring Connections

Symbi

Developing an Idea

Symbi

Studying the Form

Symbi

Finalizing the Proportions

Symbi

Refining at 1 to 1

Symbi

Refining at 1 to 1

Symbi

Symbi in situ

Symbi

Symbi in situ

Symbi

Symbi Detail

Symbi

Concept Sketches

Unit 3E

Study Model

Unit 3E

Existing Plan

Unit 3E

Proposed Plan

Unit 3E

Enlarged Study Model

Unit 3E

Diagrams

Unit 3E

Pre-Existing Conditions

Unit 3E

Construction: Shelving Detail

Unit 3E

View of Living Space © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

View of Dining Space © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

View of Kitchen © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

View of Storage Volume © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

View Towards Sleeping © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

View of Sleeping Area © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

Glass Partition Detail © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

View from Kitchen © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

View Inside Bathroom © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

Bathroom Detail © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

Bathroom Entry © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

Entry Door Detail © Bill Zbaren

Unit 3E

Artist: Benjamin Bellas

Artist Studio

Site Plan

Artist Studio

Building Envelope Strategy

Artist Studio

Program Allocation

Artist Studio

Proposed Floor Plan

Artist Studio

Model Development

Artist Studio

Proposed Section

Artist Studio

Seasons

Artist Studio

Interior View

Artist Studio

Interior View

Artist Studio

Approach

Artist Studio

Facade Diagram

Wabansia Residence

Organization Diagram

Wabansia Residence

Proposed Exterior View

Wabansia Residence

Proposed View of the Main Floor

Wabansia Residence

Proposed View of the Main Floor

Wabansia Residence

Proposed Floor Plans

Wabansia Residence

Proposed Elevations

Wabansia Residence

View of the Front Facade

Wabansia Residence

View of the Main Floor

Wabansia Residence

Detail View of Stair

Wabansia Residence

View of Kitchen

Wabansia Residence

View of Lower Level

Wabansia Residence

Design Approach Study Models

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Office Organization Model

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Floor Plan: Before

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Floor Plan: After

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Diagram: Binding Partition

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Study: Screen Pattern

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Open Workspace Elevation and Details

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Previous Conditions: Exterior

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Previous Conditions: Interior

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Demolition

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Demolition

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Construction Transformation

Ranquist Development Group Offices

View of Entrance Elevation © Mike Schwartz

Ranquist Development Group Offices

View of Binding Partition © Mike Schwartz

Ranquist Development Group Offices

View of Private Office © Mike Schwartz

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Detail View of Desk © Mike Schwartz

Ranquist Development Group Offices

View of Office from the Garage © Mike Schwartz

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Garage View © Mike Schwartz

Ranquist Development Group Offices

View of the Open Workspace © Mike Schwartz

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Detail view of the Screen © Mike Schwartz

Ranquist Development Group Offices

Concept Sketches

Chabad Center of Toledo

Study Models: Site and Form Development

Chabad Center of Toledo

Facade Studies

Chabad Center of Toledo

Circulation and Sustainable Features Diagram

Chabad Center of Toledo

Site Section

Chabad Center of Toledo

Site Plan

Chabad Center of Toledo

Model: Program Animation

Chabad Center of Toledo

Ground Level Floor Plan

Chabad Center of Toledo

Lower Level Floor Plan

Chabad Center of Toledo

Rendering View of Main Entrance

Chabad Center of Toledo

Rendering View from Rear Plaza

Chabad Center of Toledo

Rendering View Inside the Shul

Chabad Center of Toledo

Concept Sketch of Exterior Solution

Glenwood Exterior

Glenwood Exterior

Study Models of Exterior Deck and Trellis

Glenwood Exterior

Deck and Trellis Final Model

Glenwood Exterior

Prior Exterior Condition

Glenwood Exterior

Construction Progress

Glenwood Exterior

View from Lower Landing @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Exterior

View of Eating Landing @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Exterior

Trellis Detail @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Exterior

Lower Landing

Glenwood Exterior

Area of Work_Kitchen, Dining, Living

Glenwood Interior

Study Model of Main Level

Glenwood Interior

Floor Plans of Main Level

Glenwood Interior

Prior Main Level Conditions

Glenwood Interior

Construction of Main Level Renovation

Glenwood Interior

Glass Steel Support Detail

Glenwood Interior

View of Completed Renovation @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Interior

View of Kitchen Island @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Interior

Kitchen from Side Entry @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Interior

Kitchen Cabinets Detail @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Interior

Shelf Detail @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Interior

Area of Work_Basement

Glenwood Interior

Prior Basement Conditions

Glenwood Interior

Basement Remodel

Glenwood Interior

Living Area_Basement @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Interior

Sleeping Platform @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Interior

Shower and Vanity @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Interior

Vanity Detail @ Mike Schwartz

Glenwood Interior

Saving Prentice Exhibition Board

Saving Prentice

Existing Conditions: Exterior

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Existing Conditions: Interior

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Proposed Site Plan

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Design Development Process

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Proposed Section and Plan

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Construction

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Construction: Interior Skylight Framing

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Detail View of Exterior Wall © Chris Bradley

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Evening View of Addition © Chris Bradley

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Morning View of Addition © Chris Bradley

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

View Inside the Mikveh Pool © Chris Bradley

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Detail View of the Bookshelf © Chris Bradley

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

View of the Bookshelves © Chris Bradley

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

View of the Sanctuary Space © Chris Bradley

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

View of the Sanctuary Space © Chris Bradley

Chabad F.R.E.E. Center

Study Models: Circulation and Form Development

Stand Alone

Study Model: Program Diagram

Stand Alone

Project Parti Diagram: Parts

Stand Alone

Project Parti Diagram: Parts Assembled

Stand Alone

Study Model: View at Grade Level

Stand Alone

Floor Plans

Stand Alone

Elevations

Stand Alone

Rendering View from Garden

Stand Alone

Rendering View at Upper Deck Level

Stand Alone

Rendering View Inside the Studio

Stand Alone

Existing Conditions

Stand Alone

Existing Conditions

Stand Alone

Construction

Stand Alone

Construction: View Inside the Office Looking East

Stand Alone

View of West Deck

Stand Alone

View of Upper Deck

Stand Alone

Interior Ceiling Detail

Stand Alone

View of Stepped Garden

Stand Alone

View of Swimming Pool

Stand Alone

Initial Impressions: Views of The Landscape

Vegas Loft

Concept Sketch and Model

Vegas Loft

Boundary, Raised Platform Studies

Vegas Loft

Axonometric Organization Diagram

Vegas Loft

Floor Plan

Vegas Loft

Existing Conditions

Vegas Loft

Construction: Defining the Kitchen Volume

Vegas Loft

Entry: Clad with Black Metal Doors, Enclosing Mechanical Room, Laundry and Guest Bathroom

Vegas Loft

Sitting Area

Vegas Loft

Guest Bathroom Enclosure

Vegas Loft

Guest Bathroom Enclosure: Privacy Configuration

Vegas Loft

Main Living Space

Vegas Loft

Built-Out Wall: Looking North

Vegas Loft

Living Area

Vegas Loft

Master Bathroom

Vegas Loft

Study Model: View Towards the Enclosure

Coupet Enclosure

Iterative Study of Skin Pattern

Coupet Enclosure

Wood Wall Pattern Mock-up

Coupet Enclosure

Floor Plan: Previous

Coupet Enclosure

Floor Plan: Executed

Coupet Enclosure

Enlarged Detail of Wall

Coupet Enclosure

Existing Conditions

Coupet Enclosure

Existing Conditions

Coupet Enclosure

Construction: Framing

Coupet Enclosure

Construction: Door Detail

Coupet Enclosure

Construction: Door Detail

Coupet Enclosure

Concealed Bedroom Door

Coupet Enclosure

View of New Bedroom Enclosure

Coupet Enclosure

View of Bedroom Enclosure

Coupet Enclosure

View Inside Transition Corridor

Coupet Enclosure

Bedroom Wall from Inside the Room

Coupet Enclosure

Bedroom Wall Detail

Coupet Enclosure

View of Wall Inside the Second Bedroom

Coupet Enclosure

Wall Detail

Coupet Enclosure

View of Models: Initial Sexy Tables

Big Sexy Table

View of Model: First Sexy Standing

Big Sexy Table

View of Model: Sexy Legs

Big Sexy Table

View of Model: Mature Sexy

Big Sexy Table

View of Model: Big Sexy Standing

Big Sexy Table

Sexy Drawings

Big Sexy Table

View of Sexy Mock-Up

Big Sexy Table

Construction: Sexy Body

Big Sexy Table

Construction: Sexy Foot Detail

Big Sexy Table

Construction: Sexy Underbelly

Big Sexy Table

View of Big Sexy Standing

Big Sexy Table

View of Big Sexy Rear

Big Sexy Table

View of Big Sexy in Sitting Position

Big Sexy Table

Chicago's Historic Motor Row on South Michigan Avenue

Locomobile Lofts

Locomobile Lofts Building

Locomobile Lofts

Wayfinding Strategy Concept

Locomobile Lofts

Address Signage Perforation Study

Locomobile Lofts

CNC Panel Fabrication

Locomobile Lofts

Wood Panel Layering and Assembly

Locomobile Lofts

Material Palette

Locomobile Lofts

Vestibule Prior to Construction

Locomobile Lofts

Construction of the Lobby Ceiling

Locomobile Lofts

Construction: Signage Panels

Locomobile Lofts

View Inside the Vestibule © Renae Lillie

Locomobile Lofts

View of Vestibule Cladding © Renae Lillie

Locomobile Lofts

Cladding Detail

Locomobile Lofts

Hallway Views from East and West © Renae Lillie

Locomobile Lofts

View From the Elevator

Locomobile Lofts

View From the Outside © Renae Lillie

Locomobile Lofts

Concept Diagram

Planted Environment

Process Sketch

Planted Environment

Wood Screen Walls: Geometry

Planted Environment

Diagrams: Ceiling Enclosure

Planted Environment

Proposed Plan

Planted Environment

Existing Conditions

Planted Environment

Building Up the Screen Walls

Planted Environment

Building Up the Screen Walls

Planted Environment

Materials and Texture

Planted Environment

View From Entry © Nathan Kirkman

Planted Environment

View Toward Washroom © Nathan Kirkman

Planted Environment

View Toward Bar © Nathan Kirkman

Planted Environment

View of Bedroom © Nathan Kirkman

Planted Environment

View of Wall Detail © Nathan Kirkman

Planted Environment

View Inside the Yoga Room © Nathan Kirkman

Planted Environment

Concept: Parts Study

RoundKeep Table

View of Models: Assembly Results

RoundKeep Table

View of Model: Assembly Sequence

RoundKeep Table

View of Model: Material Choice

RoundKeep Table

In-Progress Fabrication

RoundKeep Table

View of Table

RoundKeep Table

Table Detail

RoundKeep Table

Initial Impressions: Montage View From Unit

Unit 4906

Process Sketches

Unit 4906

Unit Elevation and Plan

Unit 4906

Demolition

Unit 4906

Construction Sequence

Unit 4906

Completed Project © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

View of Living/Sleeping Area © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

View Toward Entry Corridor © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

West Art Wall: One Cent Life Portfolio © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

View of Hinged Art Frame: Robert Indiana - Four Winds © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

View From Entry © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

View From Bathroom © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

View of Living Area © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

Kitchen Cabinet Enclosure

Unit 4906

Floor Edge Detail

Unit 4906

View at Entry: Storage Enclosure © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

View Toward the City © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

TV Enclosure Pattern © Candice C. Cusic

Unit 4906

Sun Path

Brise Soleil Canopy

Process Sketches

Brise Soleil Canopy

Drawings: Elevations

Brise Soleil Canopy

Prior Condition

Brise Soleil Canopy

Axonometric View of Assembly Sequence

Brise Soleil Canopy

View Toward the House

Brise Soleil Canopy

View Under the Canopy

Brise Soleil Canopy

Railing Detail Connections: Outside and Inside Corners

Brise Soleil Canopy

Column Detail Connections: Deck and Canopy

Brise Soleil Canopy

View Under the Canopy

Brise Soleil Canopy

Detail: Beam to Column Connection

Brise Soleil Canopy

Concept Sketch

[S]Table

Line Drawings

[S]Table

View of Table

[S]Table

View of Table

[S]Table

Table Leg Detail

[S]Table

City Block Diagram

R-3 House

Parti

R-3 House

Passive Strategy: Light and Air Optimization

R-3 House

Building Model: Birds Eye View

R-3 House

Building Model: Elevation View

R-3 House

Building Model: Axonometric View

R-3 House

Floor Plans

R-3 House

Exterior Rendering

R-3 House

Interior Rendering: Lower Level

R-3 House

Interior Rendering: Upper Level

R-3 House

Exterior Rendering

R-3 House

Concept Diagram

Link-In Table

Piece Index

Link-In Table

Assembly Sequence

Link-In Table

Rendering View of Table

Link-In Table

Rendering View of Table

Link-In Table

Table Leg Detail

Link-In Table

View of Table

Link-In Table

View of Table

Link-In Table

Concept Diagram

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

Building Model: Plan View

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

Upper Level Plan

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

Ground Level Plan

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

Lower Level Plan

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

Sections

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

Color Inspiration: Marc Chagall Le Coq Blanc Les Deux Amants

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

View Toward North

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

View Toward South

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

View Toward East

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

View Inside the Sanctuary

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

View From Entry

Synagogue F.R.E.E.

Project Location

Unit 20G

Schematic Rendering: View From Outside

Unit 20G

Original Plan

Unit 20G

Schematic Plan

Unit 20G

Construction Plan

Unit 20G

Interior Elevations

Unit 20G

Demo

Unit 20G

View of Kitchen

Unit 20G

View Inside Kitchen

Unit 20G

Kitchen Island Detail

Unit 20G

Living Room

Unit 20G

View Toward Bedroom

Unit 20G

Bedroom View

Unit 20G

Glass Partition Detail

Unit 20G

Glass Partition Detail

Unit 20G

Bathroom View

Unit 20G

Vanity Detail

Unit 20G

Concept Image: Catalyst for Imagination

T.O.S.I.

Design Evolution

T.O.S.I.

Birdseye Model View

T.O.S.I.

Aerial View: Project Location

T.O.S.I.

Diagram: Skin and Structure

T.O.S.I.

Program Description

T.O.S.I.

Compression Space: View Looking Up

T.O.S.I.

Floor Plans: Street Level Plans

T.O.S.I.

Compression Space: View Toward the Unknown

T.O.S.I.

Compression Space: View Toward the Mysterious

T.O.S.I.

Compression Space: View Toward the Bathroom Pod

T.O.S.I.

Section: Through the Transition Space

T.O.S.I.

Diagrams: Enclosure, Water Harvesting, Daylight Collectors

T.O.S.I.

Exterior View from City Garden

T.O.S.I.

Exterior View of the Release Space

T.O.S.I.

Section: Through the Release Space

T.O.S.I.

Release Space: View Toward the City

T.O.S.I.

Exterior View from the Chicago River

T.O.S.I.

Exterior View Looking North

T.O.S.I.

Exterior View Toward TOSI

T.O.S.I.

Diagrams

T.O.S.I.

Box Transformation

J-Box

Renderings

J-Box

Jewelry Box Interior

J-Box

Jewelry Box Closed

J-Box

Form Studies

R-Chair

Plywood Sheet

R-Chair

Chair Arm Detail

R-Chair

View of Chair

R-Chair

Concept

Wedding Bands

Concept Studies

Wedding Bands

Final Product

Wedding Bands

Drawings

Sculpture Stand

Details

Sculpture Stand

View of Stand

Sculpture Stand

Model

Kesha Table

Model

Kesha Table

Plan: Initial Sheet Metal Profile

Kesha Table

Elevations

Kesha Table

View of Table

Kesha Table

Rendering of Table

Tobik Table

Elevations

Tobik Table

Table Assembly Drawings

Tobik Table

Table Leg Detail

Tobik Table

View of Table

Tobik Table

Elevations

Line Necklace

Top View

Line Necklace

Detail of Amber Connection

Line Necklace

Front View

Line Necklace

Stonehenge

Watercolor Studies

Ponte di Rialto: Venice

Watercolor Studies

United Kingdom Parliament

Watercolor Studies

London Eye

Watercolor Studies

Big Ben

Watercolor Studies

London Streetscape

Watercolor Studies

Thames Barriers: England

Watercolor Studies

Roman Baths: England

Watercolor Studies

Mevaggissey: England

Watercolor Studies

Greenwich: England

Watercolor Studies

Eden Project: England

Watercolor Studies

Dutch Landscape

Watercolor Studies

Odeonsplatz: Munich

Watercolor Studies

Olympic Village: Munich

Watercolor Studies

Barcelona

Watercolor Studies

Bilbao Streetscape

Watercolor Studies

Guggenheim Museum: Bilbao

Watercolor Studies

Guggenheim Museum: Bilbao

Watercolor Studies

Parthenon: Athens

Watercolor Studies
Chicago’s 2nd Ward was entirely re-mapped by the City Council in January 2012. The resulting boundary is sporadic, sprawling across portions of 16 Chicago neighborhoods, each made up of diverse demographics and urban conditions. From Ukrainian Village to Streeterville skyscrapers, North Avenue is an opportunity to re-visit a sense of cohesion and continuity that grounds the meandering network of neighborhoods comprising the 2nd Ward.

We are exploring an alternate transport possibility along this corridor with a potential to apply this intervention at other major thoroughfares within the city. Thinking forward using the city's past, our strategy offers the majority of the Avenue to the pedestrian. Removing personal vehicles and re-introducing a "Street Car" concept along a pedestrian-centric North Avenue will be the catalyst to becoming a healthier city.


What if there were no cars?
Oct. 30th 2032 - The Cubs won the world series yet again. North Avenue is especially quiet this morning after the celebration. The early sun glimmers off of the recently watered plants, and the last of the morning’s delivery trucks turn off onto Leavitt St. With a sly smile, I realize that these may be the last automobiles I see all day.

Could we walk anywhere?
The beautiful quiet is only partially disturbed as the streetcar hums past. It stops and lets out what feels like an endless stream of people connecting to the Damen “L” stop. Café seating bleeds into a grassy knoll. Customers enjoy the last warm days as they watch cyclists fly down the middle of the Avenue.
As the streetcar disappears into the distance, I try to imagine the invisible lines marking Bucktown, Wicker Park, Noble Square, Goose Island, Lincoln Park, Old Town, and Gold Coast. But they are impossible to make out through the procession of fall foliage.

Could the street transform?
At the Goose Island stop, the Chicago River opens a hole in the urban fabric, and the vista of the downtown skyline rises up. Ahead, a group of elderly men are slowly exercising under the shade of an old rail bridge. I see a crowd gathering in the distance. As I approach, the sound of laughter fills the air. The wide patio in front of The Second City is ringed by a low berm, pushing the streetcar rails to the far side of the Avenue and forming an impromptu theater.

Could it grow?
Dark clouds make their way across the sky. Rain is not a problem after the new setbacks ordinance. Almost all of the buildings overhang the Avenue, providing cover from the unpredictable weather. This loose experience of the city was once found only on North Avenue, but now these curb-less thoroughfares have sprouted up across the city. Similar lines on the ground, surrounded by stretches of paving and nature cast wide, green net, which holds the city together.
The 2016 West Rice residences are located in the heart of one of the Chicago’s oldest established neighborhoods, Ukrainian Village. Comprised of 4 uniquely configured duplexes with 4 single story units stacked above, this 8 unit residential typology is a design response to our client’s need to maximize the buildable footprint.

The outcome is a building consisting of individual urban dwellings wrapped within one contiguous shell. Unlike a single family home, each unit is designed with at least three distinct orientations, maximized for daylight exposure, cross breezes throughout the day and ample outdoor space.

The exterior appearance and massing of this structure are a direct result of the careful interior planning. The two large cubic voids at the SE and NW corners of the building define the exterior terraces for the upper floor units. While the nested structures within the voids echo Chicago’s infamous fire escapes, they help with anchoring the street's corner edge as well. Additionally, the careful placement of the individual openings in the building’s corrugated metal skin appear more as perforations within the mass, visually reducing the overall sense of this project’s scale among its neighbors. The reflective qualities of the selected exterior cladding creates a dynamic play of light and shadow across the façades, highlighting atmospheric changes brought forth by the seasons and throughout each day.

Articulation of building elements intended to echo time and mark its place within this historic city block.
Located within an eclectic arts district of a suburban Chicago neighborhood, this neglected structure was acquired by our client as an opportunity to breathe new life and meaning to an existing shell for him and his college age kids.

The building extends to the lot lines on three sides and amidst the rezoning process, the municipality mandated these three visible facades were to be kept. As such, we used this directive as an opportunity to resolve the two key elements the existing configuration lacked -privacy and daylight. Thus, we looked to the existing roof as a solution to create an interior courtyard. In cutting away the existing roof along the southern and eastern exterior walls, a newly formed semi-private space becomes a living threshold between the street’s hard edge and a new glass enclosure. Now, the sun’s rays are able to penetrate deep into the footprint of the home, revealing the poetic qualities of these masonry walls, which also serve as a new elevation seen from within.

The overall plan is anchored by the introduction of three multi-purpose, wood clad volumes, defining the sleeping areas along one side and the flexible family functions on the other. The placement of the garage in close proximity of the primary structure, together with its direct link to an integrated workspace defines another type of courtyard, opening up to the most intimate room of the home, the master suite. This auxiliary structure adds to the reinforcement of the interior and exterior organization while providing privacy from adjacent lots.

Overall, this project exemplifies the opportunities existing structures offer, in opposition to most buildings, which are razed in disregard.
Within this iconic high-rise unit, our clients imagined their second home with few boundaries between them and the exterior breathtaking views. By removing all of the opaque walls and introducing an architectural language of floating volumes and space-defining planes, we created the desired spatial experiences that did not previously exist.

At the entry, while drawing direct connections with the lake, we added an open kitchen creating a multi-functional space. To the right, the carefully placed floating mass welcomes you, gesturing towards the main room. As it extends deeper into the living space, a reading nook is formed at the back of the projection, offering a sense of refuge inside of an open plan. When sitting, this projected element transforms, reflecting the adjacent spaces within its carved niche.

The integration of a seemingly continuous glass plane provides privacy between the two primary living zones. However, its true function is to create a backdrop of illusion, capturing the expansiveness of the exterior, as well as the dynamic mood changes of the Great Lake.

In re-orienting the plumbing-dependent elements of both the kitchen and bath towards the lake, we physically and visually connected them with adjacently shared zones. Now, one can admire the sunrise while showering and absorbing the horizontal morning light.

While placing emphasis on the refined expression of the building’s minimalist tradition, a quiet living space is formed for contemplation and refuge in the sky.





AWARDS

2017 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Honor Award

2017 AIA Chicago Small Projects Citation of Merit Award




PRESS

2017 Dezeen*
Four years after successfully renovating the common areas in the historic Locomobile Loft building, we were invited back to re-design its only amenity; an old, secluded fitness room. In contrast to the previous improvements of the common areas, this hidden space stood out as a derelict with little known use. Thus, our intent to make this program relevant again focused on augmenting the connection between the building tenants and their shared living place.

Strategically, the fitness room needed a revised entry sequence, distinguished from the existing unit doors. In creating a large cut and a subtle angle within the common wall, we formalized a polarizing entry along the context of the narrow, and long hall. Within this formed transition space, a large glass door acts as an aperture, providing a greater sense of comfort and security from within. On the inside of the room, we re-appropriated the non-fitness related functions, stacking them upward inside the reflective core. This new found verticality, literally, created much needed breathing room, while gaining the extra area at the main floor. An energy recovery ventilator was part of the new integrated mechanical system, offsetting energy use while enhancing the air quality for all.

A modular, undulating cladding strategy was employed as an exploration of how one comfortably occupies an inside corner within a small cube-like room. As a result, the perimeter becomes more flexible with greater freedom to place objects and supporting functions along the continuous wall. We utilized CNC technology for increased efficiency and fluidity, highlighting quality and craftsmanship, which the prior space severely lacked.

This dynamic space is a new chapter to building’s historic existence, and with the tenant’s increased awareness of improved spatial qualities, we hold confident it will withstand time and add an intrinsic value for all to share.




AWARDS

2017 AIA Chicago Small Projects Citation of Merit Award
Symbi’s intention is to fulfill the need to create a functional object that can exist in various locations within a dwelling. Assembled using rotated and overlapping Walnut and Maple pieces, this sculptural composition is meant for hanging and organizing personal "stuff" or it is purely an object for visual pleasure as it leans gently against your wall.
The renovation of this lower floor apartment began with a clear intent, to achieve unobstructed views towards the lake from all vantage points within the unit.

First, the sleeping and living arrangements were re-configured and separated with a floor to ceiling glass wall. The inherent properties of the material enables one to see the lake at any given time, either in the reflection or directly through. The applied gradient pattern in the glass adds a sense of privacy within this fully open plan. To further maintain the sight lines, we hid the large living clutter, integrating it within the perimeter demising zones. Behind what appears as a continuous wood wall, an abundance of storage space is allocated, while the floating shelves and low profile millwork add a sense cohesive stitching between the various living zones. Even in the selection of the furnishings we tried to keep the views clear choosing elements that are not opaque or solid. In the kitchen, the deepest and darkest area of the apartment we borrowed natural daylight through the bathroom space, by creating a direct aperture towards the lake through the layers of “smart” glass enclosure in the shower wall.

As a result, we achieved our initial intent, while paying subtle tribute to the building’s refined clarity and to its architecture master of less is more.




AWARDS

2016 Chicago Design Award

2016 AIA Chicago Design Excellence Award

2016 Custom Home Design Award

2016  AIA Chicago Small Projects Citation of Merit Award




PRESS

2017 Elle Decoration China

2016 Dezeen*

2016 CS Interior

2016 Phaidon*

2016 Wallpaper*
Given the prominence of the Vermont’s mountainous landscape, this artist studio is configured to maximize ones connection with its surroundings. From one end of the space capturing the views of the bolder tree lines and at the other the majestic mountain range.

The primary work area is located within an implied viewing tube of inspiration, defined by partial height walls inside a rectangular cedar clad enclosure. The plan contains double-sided display walls, desk space, distinct working zones and back of house storage, all within one open space. A wood-burning fireplace exists at the hinge point inside, keeping the space functional during the cold winter months.

The studio, though small has multiple states of existence. The dappling of light, dynamic casts of shadows, the sound of rain hitting the metal roof, the feeling of cross breezes are the materials of inspiration for the artist in his domain.
A Chicago developer tasked us to create a new office atmosphere within an existing single story masonry shell. Our strategy was to place emphasis on the intrinsic character of materials used to build this simple box. First, we needed to uncloak its forgotten beauty, hidden behind the layers of old gypsum skin. Once the perimeter was brought back to life, we kept clear of it, and began to introduce the components needed for an everyday “office use”.

An oversized communal desk with integrated storage was placed in the center of the room. Structurally supported by two thin perforated metal screens, the desks appear to be cut into smaller segments, defining multiple work areas needed within the single shared space. These striking sheets of metal are designed to be visually intriguing, enhancing the raw qualities of an existing skin. To further separate the office from its adjacent zones, we introduced a continuous black “binding wall” snaking through various programmatic needs. Storage, mechanical closet and a private office are carefully sculpted within this single move. The lack of natural daylight in the space was solved through the placement of large panes of glass as separating walls, borrowing light and adding views throughout. In challenging the notion of private space, a sense of community is achieved, providing a collaborative environment within a shared workplace. Now the occupants are more connected with their immediate surroundings and feel much less divided and contained.





AWARDS

2015  AIA Chicago Design Excellence Citation of Merit Award

2015  AIA Chicago Small Projects Citation of Merit Award

2015  A/N Best of 2015 Non Residential Interior Honorable Mention

2015  Crain's 2015 Chicago's Coolest Offices




PRESS

2016 Interior Design Magazine

2016 Business Punk

2015 Crain's Chicago Business

2015 Dezeen

2015 ArchDaily





EXHIBIT

2015  The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design.

In establishing a new chapter within the Jewish community of Toledo the design for the Chabad House and its multitude of programs starts with the planning strategy for the overall site. The main building program is allocated at the highest point on this long narrow property, centrally placed from front to back. As a result, the building becomes a threshold between the outward public zone and a more secluded, private area beyond. To respect the low profile of the surrounding residential neighborhood, the educational program of the complex is nestled partially below grade and screened with native vegetation. This site specific approach enables the overall structure to appear as a one story volume from the main pedestrian street. Multiple access paths are integrated throughout, connecting the Center's programs in a meandering configuration. A field house is placed adjacent to the main building, framing an intimate outdoor gathering space at the west end of the site.

The overall building form is the result of a rotation in the upper programmed volume. This shift allows the Center to face directly east, optimizing the direction of daily prayers. This configuration enables the complex to appear as though it opens-up and reaches-out, similar to Chabad's role within the Toledo community. To further reinforce the inviting character of this facility, the proposed façade treatment softens the building’s rigid form. It evokes a sense of change and gentleness via the interplay of light and shadow on its rippling wood-clad folds.

On the interior, the main building’s program is arranged in such a way that each element functions as an independent part. Each takes part in defining the large multipurpose space, yet this organization allows for smaller functions to coexist within the overall open room. Colorful sliding glass partitions are inserted for greater visual intrigue and flexibility in subdividing the spaces further. In providing an uninterrupted visual connection with the outside combined with an abundance of daylight from all directions, a desired feeling of a spiritual home is attained. Providing a sense of place for the constituents of Chabad.





AWARDS

2015  AIA Chicago Citation of Merit Award



EXHIBIT

2015  The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design.

The solution for the renovation of this small, narrow exterior space was to create a multi-functional outdoor room.

To maximize the use of this tight area, a series of cascading landings were introduced to subtly separate the functions of outdoor eating, relaxation and play. From the inside of the house, the exterior room was designed to appear as an extension of the interior. As one steps outside, they are enveloped by the surrounding trellis. Its aluminum tubular structure further reinforces a sense of enclosure, complementing the geometric fanning of the stacking decks. Once the vining plants make their way up the diagonal guide wires, they will provide additional shade, offer greater privacy and enhance the experience via the aromas of the flowering plants.



PRESS

2016 Builder Magazine

2014 Crain's Chicago Business



EXHIBIT

2015  The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design.
Throughout its lifespan, this 20th century Chicago greystone, had gone through various modifications, primarily at the rear, where the kitchen is located. This resulted in small, compartmentalized spaces that were dark, awkward and limiting in circulation. The client asked us to address these issues and to rethink the space so that it can easily absorb the daily family activities.

Through the removal of most of the interior walls and the strategic placement of the living elements, we created openness and added an abundance of natural light. In doing so, we formed opportunities for movement throughout the most active part of this home. To further underscore the circulation, emphasis was placed on the visual and physical connections between the newly-defined kitchen, dining and family areas. The result is a light, contemporary expression placed in subtle contrast to the rest of the home, marking a significant moment in the thoughtful evolution of its interior.

The second part of our involvement was to create a guest suite in the unfinished part of the basement. As with the renovation to the upper level, the theme of continuity persists. However, the individual challenges of this particular space resulted in a slightly different expression. In configuring the space, we worked around the existing structural elements, incorporating them into the project to every extent possible and finding design opportunities amidst the awkward quirks. The uneven foundation walls, sloping floors and old, painted beams were the catalysts for the precise solutions that now appear coordinated and well arranged. In this simple juxtaposition of materials, color and natural light, we were able to compliment the natural beauty of some of these hundred-year-old building components, making the newly created guest suite feel as an oasis from the rest of the home above.



PRESS


2016 Builder Magazine

2014 Crain's Chicago Business

2014 Houzz



EXHIBIT

2015  The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design.
“Great architecture has only two natural enemies: water and stupid men.” – Richard Nickel

The government-endorsed push to demolish Prentice is a significant current event. Sadly, however, it represents just one in a much longer sequence of short-sighted actions. These tragedies have been repeated by a city which has all-too-often prioritized the rapid development of the 'new' over the thoughtful integration of the 'old.' Too many times in Chicago's short history, significant buildings have been hastily razed, leaving only quiet echoes of the great lessons they once offered. Many have fallen; few have been saved, but the sad and tenuous appreciation for Chicago's architectural history remains unchanged.

Our image does not aspire to answer the difficult question of how to breathe new life into this magnificent structure. It is instead a thoughtful gesture, hinged on history, meant to fuel the fight to keep it alive. How can we begin to assign new purpose to a building without first securing the commitment of its primary stakeholders? Before we speculate - before we create - it is imperative that a dedication to preserve our city’s history is elicited from these parties. They must realize the value of the treasure they hold in their hands and it is our job, as advocates for preservation, to harness all resources at our disposal to convince them. It is only then, with all parties devoted to a singular purpose, that the creative forces of the design community may be channeled into a newly-imagined future for Prentice.

PRESS

Chicago Architecture Club-Exhibition Link
Chicago Architecture Club-Competition Link
Chicago Architecture Foundation Link
This renovation and addition to the Chabad FREE of Niles was driven by the need to improve and update a religious facility which had been operating in this 1950's single story house for over 25 years. Through various previous renovations the building preserved its residential character; however, with the new updates and enlarged footprint this former residence now meets all the necessary requirements to function as an institutional facility.

The organization of this newly renovated building was thought of in three parts, two service zones that flank the sanctuary space at the east and west sides. This resulted in a square plan for the main gathering space, providing greater flexibility for various functions and events. A new large skylight was inserted into the space to add much needed ceiling height for the ritual raising of the Torah (Hebrew Bible Scroll) during prayers. Book shelves wrap the space and are arranged in a diagonal pattern, subtly echoing the lines in the Star of David. Their placement is meant to be a reminder to the occupants that this religious center is not only a place for prayer but a sanctuary for learning as well.

Because the rear of the building is in close proximity to its neighbors, we wanted to reduce the scale and appearance of this newly added structure. It therefore sits in subtle contrast to the existing building configuration in geometry and material and is meant to read as an insertion rather than an addition. What appears as a kink in the rear façade, is a response to a strict build able area requirements. This architectural gesture forms a new entry and re-appropriates square footage to the zones in the building which need it more.




PRESS

2012 Daily Herald

2014 Architect Magazine



EXHIBIT

2015  The Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design.
Tucked discreetly into a small Chicago block, this rear addition addresses the coexistence of two primary design criteria - integration and detachment. Integration drove the ground level, where an existing masonry, dark, pool room and a cluttered exterior courtyard were opened-up and then stitched back together to produce one contiguous interior/exterior space. By introducing new full height exterior glass walls for the pools enclosure and placing diagonal steel structure on the outside of the building envelope we were able to achieve a sense of expansiveness within. Now, natural light is able to pour in at all times of the day and the owners can take advantage of the newly renovated landscape. Appearing to hover above, the broad cantilever ceiling plane not only add to the visual extension of the room, but also serves as a desired covered walkway between the house and the open rear yard beyond.

Atop the pool, a mixed-use upper floor is formed. A stepped garden links the upper level of the existing home to the lower landing level of the rear stair. From this newly created exit door, a translucent passageway leads to a detached office space. Sitting perched on a plinth clad in Brazilian Ash (Garapa) the work space is wrapped in standing seam zinc panels with full height glass walls defining the other 3 sides. While seated at his desk like a captain of his ship the connection to the outside is unobstructed. The neighborhood appears to be brought inside with vegetables and flowering plants cloaking the periphery. Light and air fully permeates the space and with a few extensions of the exterior materials being pulled inside, the office area accomplishes a greater sense of visual expansion. The methods used to integrate this unique program within the constraint parameters of city lot resulted in new areas for gardening and refuge that were not possible to have before.
This corner loft in a Las Vegas high-rise was purchased by a bachelor with the intent to display a large collection of paintings, varying from the 1950s- present. In contrast to the empty feeling of the existing space, we were captivated by the client’s unique collection of artwork and the stunning views from this high floor unit.

The decision was made to completely build out the viewing perimeter in order to transform it into one continuous, floating picture plane. As it wraps the existing interior, a series of ocular zones are created at each of the window openings, adding discreet spaces within this new wall. To re-capturing some of the lost square footage due to the new built-out wall we incorporated household functions within its depth at various strategic locations. This loft is further transformed with a raised wood platform, running continuously around the entire Northwest perimeter; it subtly defines a new zone within this seemingly open plan.

To underline the openness of this apartment, the majority of the existing partitions were removed. The entry sequence is reconfigured and is clad with black metal door panels enclosing two service areas. These large panels can be positioned in such a way as to provide a common hand washing area or a private second bath.

Formerly segregated, the main sleeping and bathroom areas are no longer visually disconnected. With the elimination of the existing partition wall and the removal of the dropped ceiling over the bathing area, more natural light fills the space. As one steps into the shower, the mountains at the North are in clear view and at no point are you disconnected from seeing the outside world. Separating the sleeping area is the new screen wall. Constructed from hanging ropes and varying wood end pieces, it appears dynamic and light. Its intent is to provide a sense of enclosure amidst an open plan while echoing the undulation of the desert landscape beyond.
This project mandated the division of an awkwardly-configured bedroom into two distinct sleeping quarters. Due to open character of the loft space and the existing tall ceilings, we approached the solution with the understanding that the new configuration would ultimately result in relatively small yet vertical zones. Thus, we chose to bring down one’s visual perception of the existing space and created a “binding” separation, while dedicating one window within each of the new rooms.

The new enclosure for the main sleeping zone is meant to read as an inserted-mass. After entering the space through a concealed door, one realizes that the mass is just a simple composition of two delicate, L-shaped walls. One of which is clad with alternating vertical
oak strips providing visual depth within. Both natural and artificial light brings out the resulting pattern and the intended articulation of the clad wall.

Ultimately, the small intervention has transcended the simplicity of its function (to separate) to become the main binding-element of the loft space, stitching together surrounding spaces and blurring the boundaries in between.


PRESS

2011           Houzz
The design for this dining table emerged from a desire to create an elegant and functional eating surface, intended to reside within an open-plan loft apartment. Because the table will be a center piece that will be seen and interacted with from all sides, achieving a sculptural appearance was of priority. As such, our goal was to create a dynamic, clear-span structure that is also thin and elegant in appearance. The use of triangulated origami-like surfaces made up of visually-separated materials provided the intent for which we were searching. A continuous shadow reveal in–between the sandwiched planes creates a linear void that can be traced from the foot of the table to the thin groove along its top. The primary table structure is integrated into the form and is inset from the outer edge. The middle diamond-shape element, which is primarily seen while one is sitting, acts as the binding structure between the two symmetrical halves. This not only provides the stability for the table but also adds to its overall sexiness.
The Locomobile Lofts, located in Chicago’s Historic Motor Row on S. Michigan Avenue, is a building rich with historical narrative. The precursor to modern day automotive dealerships, the building was once used for the production, sale & distribution of Locomobile vehicles. When converted for residential use in 2004 by a Chicago Developer, the richness of the building’s history was cloaked with layers of conventional thought and a pallet of materiality devoid of any connection to the building’s industrial spirit.

In 2010, we were commissioned to create a new spatial identity. By reconfiguring the existing boundaries and establishing new thresholds in the sequence of movement, the renovation of the common spaces tries to marry the historical identity with the building’s present use. Moreover, it seeks to reemphasize the urban presence of the building by empowering the entry lobby, creating a bold, yet respectful presence along Michigan Avenue. By implementing new perforated wood cladding around the interior perimeter of the entry vestibule, the space becomes a discreet, welcoming threshold along a larger cohesive sequence of entry.

Large, backlit address signage illuminates the space, projecting its colored light onto the street. The rhythm of new floor & wall finishes, together with varying ceiling heights, complements an elaborate arrangement of new lights and wood panels. With the introduction of these new elements, the imbalance in scale between the former industrial function of the building and its current residential use is mediated. This renovation adds a new chapter in the historic timeline of the Locomobile building.



AWARDS

2013  AIA Chicago Small Firm / Small Project Award, Citation of Merit Award



PRESS

2012  AIA Young Architects Forum, "Evolution of an IDE..."

2011  Tatlin News

2011  Design Home Online

2011  Style of Design

2011  Archfreeze 
The newly renovated single-story space inscribes the functions of living, entertaining and yoga into a traditional suburban home. The Clients, having lived and traveled in the eastern world, aspired to transplant the character of Southeast Asian living into their home. Rather than forcing the marriage between these two dissimilar architectural languages, the choice to disconnect each from the other created a world within a world.

The fluid arrangement of spaces and the tectonic assembly of materials are in contrast to the rest of the house, thus providing a greater sense of transition from the everyday indoor environment. The conventional language of privacy enclosures is replaced with screening elements, typically found in the Eastern world. The partial height screens provide substantial visual privacy yet allow for light and air to permeate through the resultant voids. Drawing on the horizontality of plywood, the walls are assembled to appear woven. Each rectangular piece of Baltic birch plywood is placed individually, not unlike the tedious assembly of the hand-crafted water hyacinth furniture housed in the space.

The ceiling soffit adds an organizational framework between the vertical variation in the ceiling height and the overall plan. Its geometry is derived from the boundaries of existing infrastructural elements and runs counter to the direction of the spatial flow. The new vegetation embraces the walls, transforming the space and in time, enriches the planted environment.



AWARDS

2013  AIA Chicago Small Firm / Small Project Award, Honor Award



PRESS

2016  Custom Builder, "Separate but Equal"  , (PDF)

2013  Modern Luxury Interiors, "Curve Appeal"

2012  AIA Young Architects Forum, "Evolution of an IDE..."

2012  M^2 Interior Design 4

2011  AEC Cafe

2011  Tatlin News

2011  Studs in Design

2011  Chicago Architect, "Hooray for Bali Wood"

2011  Karmatrendz

2011  Tistory

2011  Architizer

2011  Not-For-Them

2011  Archimodes

2011  Archdaily

2011  Architizer

This coffee table base is designed as a sequential step-by-step assembly logic using three flat, rectangular sheets of material. The interlocking of the three discreet planes creates a triangulated form which, when subsequently bent, attains a rigid structural expression.

In order to achieve a functional purpose for this table, a rectangular piece of glass is placed on top of the base. A dialogue between the sculptural base and the rectangular top is created via the cutout within the glass. Mimicking the profile of the structure below, the resultant void provides a functional area for a flower vase. Fresh flowers emerge out of the base, complementing the organic nature of the table form.



PRESS

2012  Cool Entrepreneurs

2011  Design Milk
This small studio unit was designed as an austere pallet of overlapping spaces and expressions. Subservient to the Client’s unique portfolio of Pop Art lithographs, the functional elements of open apartment living are hidden from view, allowing one to feel as though they’ve stepped into a gallery space wired for living rather an apartment space equipped to display art.

The unit’s only aperture opens to the north, framing Chicago's iconic Lake Shore Drive; a view which seams together the dynamic composition of the undulating high-rise buildings with the fluidity of Lake Michigan. The image of these two worlds drove the organization of the unit’s interior. The sculptural interweaving of form and space speaks of the incidental voids amidst the City’s oscillating texture below.

Alternatively, the Client’s art collection is choreographed along the space’s west wall, becoming a spectacle of tranquility, a moment of pause similar to the calm found in looking onto the lake. The rare 2-sided lithographs are wall-mounted on hinged frames, offering the Client and his guests the ability to take all fragments in at once. Each time the work is engaged, the configuration changes. Over time, the wall shifts, adjusts and moves, becoming a real-time expression of the interplay between the viewer and his/her surroundings.



AWARDS

2013  AIA Chicago Small Firm / Small Project Award, Citation of Merit Award



PRESS

2013  Rohous

2011  Tatlin News

2011  TheArchHive

2010  Arch Daily

2010  Chicago Architect Magazine, "A Lesson in Less"

2010  Architizer
This sun-shading device was designed as an extension to an existing outdoor deck structure. The permeable canopy acts as a semi-enclosed space, creating a transition into the house while providing shelter from the sun. New cedar columns are spliced to the existing wooden posts and sculpted to give support for the primary beams tying back to the existing masonry wall. A lattice of thinner elements is placed perpendicular to the beams in an alternating rhythm, casting dynamic shadows on the incidental surfaces. The deep horizontal projection of the canopy allows for greater shelter from the harsh southwest exposure, shielding the lower level of the house in the summer months while allowing the low-angle winter sun to permeate the home’s interior.
Custom table for a private client


PRESS

2010  Home Decoring
A new prototype for smart living in Chicago, the R-3 House embraces the multitude of restrictions acting on the standard single-family site. Rigid building codes and strict zoning constraints combined with a growing cultural concern for environmental sensitivity set the stage for a design process rich with fruitful constraints. The house works within the web of these obstacles, treating them as cornerstones to a design process focused on producing spaces that efficiently cater to the nuances of a smart lifestyle.

The project prides itself on efficiency, both spatially and environmentally. It begins with an awareness of its immediate surrounding, employing an integrated assembly of sustainable systems, passive strategies and recycled materials. Spatially, the house reclaims the full extent of interior space, eliminating the redundancy of circulation space which allows spaces to flow seamlessly, one to the next. Public and private zones are interactive, the qualities of each reinforcing the character of the other. The perimeter envelope adjusts along its length, creating a blurred relationship between interior and exterior spaces. It results in a streaming interior, rich with natural light, unobstructed views and connectivity to the neighborhood that it resides within.
Link-In table is designed as a fully collapsible table. This table doesn’t use any form of adhesive, so every part of the table is crucial in creating balance. This product is made out of maple wood boards that are assembled to overlap each other, and glass that functions as the final element to lock the construction in place.



PRESS

2010  DeTnk

2009  Fold Magazine

2009  Design Milk

2009  Design Dose
A new two story Jewish cultural center is placed on the periphery of a residential neighborhood hovering slightly above the ground. Two wings, one housing a synagogue and other classrooms, embrace the visitor as one approaches the building. The visual transparency of the facades creates a departure from the paradigm of introverted religious institutions. In doing so, the traditional ceremonies are no longer hidden from people of other faiths. Its vertical glass fin structure oscillates between transparent and opaque relative to the viewing angle of the user.

A concrete shell unifies the two wings, its form echoing the folds of the Talis garment used by a married man during prayer. The sunken base of the building opens up to the west and houses a large dining area with an adjacent bath house wing. The base of the building is meant to function independently of the main body above yet activities overlap regularly. The building embodies openness and embrace, welcoming people of all ages to gather, pray, learn and rest.


PRESS

2005           Architecture List
The desired objective for the renovation of this unit was a sense of lightness and openness. A solution to create an awareness of the apartment perimeter was achieved by providing a direct visual connectivity between living areas via the use of transparent, translucent and reflective materials. New partitions are slightly pulled away from the existing walls, shadow gaps and variation in material depths allow the eye to focus beyond the initial surfaces.

The primary partition between the living and bedroom is built using two glass types. Translucent glass providing privacy to the bedroom sits atop a clear section which allows for an uninterrupted visual continuity between the adjacent spaces. The exterior glass wall of the apartment has an inherent reflective quality at night. To stress the illusion of a space flowing out into the city, emphasis was placed on the perpendicular orientation of the ceiling lights as well as the floor pattern. This reinforced a mirror effect, making the space appear larger than it actually is. Polished slate stone tiles in wet areas provide ease of maintenance and create a subtle zone differentiation within the open space. Direct rays of sunlight wash the rest of the cleft tiles evoking the natural beauty of the slate strata. In the warm months the slate stays cool to the touch while during the cold season it retains the heat from the building's radiant heating system.
The Temple of Shared Imagination (TOSI) is a place of continuity, mystery and discovery. It is a space that evolved as an outcome or a response to the dense urban fabric found in the vibrant business district of Chicago's downtown.

TOSI is an attempt to create a place where architecture evokes the imagination of its users by creating a link between the city and its people. It introduces a new architectural language into its context as well as a variation of extreme architectural experiences for its inhabitants.

During the evolution of the design, a pedestrian bridge emerged as a segment of a larger entity; a phenomenal link between inhabitants of the project and the street.
Custom jewelry box for a private client
Custom chair for a private client
Custom rings for a private client
Custom stand for a private client
Custom table for a private client.
Custom table for a private client
Custom necklace designed for a private client
Watercolor studies were created while traveling through Europe, capturing the dynamic qualities of space, place and time while exploring various watercolor techniques